What questions we ask

… and where

The Family Migration and Early Life Outcomes (FAMELO) project studies the dynamic role migration may play in children’s lives. The project is made up of three distinct but interlinked studies analyzing children’s:

  1. Socioemotional development
  2. Educational aspirations and expectations
  3. Early family formation and transition to adulthood

We study these topics by conducting comparable longitudinal surveys of children and their caregivers in households with and without migrants in three traditional sending areas: Jalisco, Mexico; Gaza, Mozambique; and Chitwan, Nepal.

Research Team

Institutions

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Arizona State University

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The Ohio State University

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Pennsylvania State University

Principal Investigators

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Jennifer Glick

Program Director & Principal Investigator Project 2

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Natalie D. Eggum-Wilkens

Principal Investigator of Project 1

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Sarah R. Hayford

Principal Investigator of Project 3

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Scott Yabiku

Data Collection and Data Management Core Director

Site Partners

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CEPSA

Site Partner in Mozambique

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ISER-N

Site Partner in Nepal

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Dra. Bertha L. Nuño-Gutiérrez

Site Partner in Mexico

Graduate Students

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Haoyang Zhang

Graduate Research Assistant

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Melissa Alcaraz

Graduate Research Assistant

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Sarah Miller

Graduate Research Assistant

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Erick Axxe

Graduate Research Assistant

Recent & Upcoming Talks

Migration is an increasingly prevalent demographic behavior that has important consequences for families and communities around the …

Socialization is the process through which children learn values and behaviors that are appropriate in their cultural communities. …

Migration affects many families across the globe, yet, we know very little concerning how parental migration affects children’s …

How migration influences social competence when children are left-behind in their communities of origin is not well understood. We …

In post-industrialized nations, the transition to adulthood is evolving to reflect the needs of new economies, the role of education in …

Research was supported by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number P01HD080659. The content is solely the responsibility of the researchers and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.